• Books

    Sunday Salon: The Third

    In the morning, I read the Saturday Globe and Mail newspaper. I rarely read the newspaper because I get most of my news online or from TV. Unlike my dad only reads newspapers now. like reading the weekend editions because they offer so much more than simple news. I would like to keep it up weekly because I like G&M’s Books section particularly. I said a few posts back that I am not big on book reviews, but reviews provide discovery to new books. I added a lot of books to my library request list as a result. The G&M features a lot of Canadian lit which is something I am not overly familiar with shamefully. Speaking of which, the newspaper told me Anne of Green Gables is turning 100 this spring, and there is already a new tv movie for it. Also, someone has written a prequel to the series.

    This afternoon, I finished The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper. I read half of it today; it was the only thing I really read this past week. I skimmed a lot of the book, but I didn’t give up since I had to read it for a challenge. I’m sure Eugene Onegin will be a better read this week.

    Actually, I think I will peruse V for Vendetta now.

    This is only my third Sunday Salon, but I am really loving the whole routine. It allows me to manage a time when I can read even just a little bit and retire my increasingly busy life. I have managed to read and finish a book since I started this two weeks ago.

    Next weekend: Onegin as mentioned. Possibly Othello, Life and Times of Michael K., and The Count of Monte Cristo. My TBR pile is obscenely high that I have many choices.

    Literary Links:

    How can I become a better and more prolific reader? – from Metafilter

    Best All-Time Children’s Books – from Zen Habits. I’ve read and loved a lot of the books from this list.

    Will cell phones save books? – from ComputerWorld.

    Twilight of the books – from The New Yorker. I love the New Yorker; wish I had a subscription. This article looks at what low current reading rates mean, a world without reading, and just how words and language have been throughout history.

    The Death of Postmodernism and Beyond – from Philosophy Now by Alan Kirby in 2006. Article asserting the end of postmodernism and how literature is now at what Kirby calls “pseudo modernism”.