aquatique

books, knitting, food and whatever else I want to write about

Busy Bee that I am, I have not been able to devote time to reading or any of my hobbies. I obviously miss it, though I managed to read Blankets by Craig Thompson this week, and I continue to read Count of Monte Cristo in email. I actually read the emails every day now as opposed to forgetting about it and catching up later. There is quite a bit of political history in the book,…

Been awhile since I updated the challenges list. There are too many and I just joined another one! In any case, I anticipate I'll be reading more avidly again in two weeks. In other news, I updated Wordpress to version 2.5; it usually takes me months until after a release to upgrade. For further procrastination and fun, I changed the layout Current Challenges Book Awards (9 of 12) - A couple of the books I've…

Blankets is a graphic novel of first love, growing up, faith and the loss of it. It is nearly 600 pages of black and white graphic storytelling. The style is fairly realistic and very wonderfully drawn at times. Craig Thompson is definitely creative and a talented artist. Something about the simplicity of the drawings were evocative. The graphic novel medium is very well suited to autobiographies and memoirs such as this. It is especially apt…

While acknowledging that we can’t judge books by their covers, how much does the design of a book affect your reading enjoyment? Hardcover vs. softcover? Trade paperback vs. mass market paperback? Font? Illustrations? Etc.? - BTT I generally prefer hardcovers over softcovers. Having said that, they are heavy to carry around, and in the few times of the year when I buy books, I prefer trade paperbacks. I like their smooth covers, the better than…

The ever popular Gretel. I actually made a regular version of this in February with the Tubular cast on and this same yarn. I wasn't paying attention and it resulted a lot of errors. It also looked a bit odd on my big head even if it did cover my years. I frogged the hat and my Koolhaas too (since that was too big and hopefully I have enough yarn to make another regular one…

This week, I continued to read Count of Monte Cristo in DailyLit email installments. I have reached Dantes being jailed. I really like the novel so far. I think I will like it more than The Three Musketeers, and Edmond will probably surpass them as my favourite Dumas character as well. I started reading Othello this week as I said would, and I read a couple of scenes of Act I today.  This is my…

Even though I told myself I would not join another shorter than six months book challenge, and yet here I am! The Non-Fiction Five Challenge runs from May to September 2008. It's five books, and at least one of them should be a different genre of non fiction (memoir, history, etc). Am I going to complete this? Who knows. Here is my tenative list which is subject to change at any time of course. I have…

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's short novel of a day in a Stalinist camp is a story of human dignity, survival and faith. The Stalinist prisons were not for criminals, and they attempted to break the wills of those in the camps. Ivan, or Shukhov as he is referred mostly in novel, is essentially a dignified and proud character. The characterization is subtle. He is from a peasant background and not particularly intellectual, religious, or rebellious, but there is…

You’ve just reached the end of a book . . . what do you do now? Savor and muse over the book? Dive right into the next one? Go take the dog for a walk, the kids to the park, before even thinking about the next book you’re going to read? What? (Obviously, there can be more than one answer, here–a book with a cliff-hanger is going to engender different reactions than a serene, stand-alone, but…

Another week, mostly the same things. I'm up to chapter 7 of The Count of Monte Cristo and still lots of characters introduced. I finally finished reading One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, and as I predicted, I got into it at the end. Mostly the writing and the character came into such focus towards the end. The review will be up sometime this week, and I want time to read some critical…

In December 2006, I started participating in 365 Days, a self-portrait a day for a year. I had just bought my first digital camera after years of coveting and a flickr account to boot. I only managed to do 129 days of photos; it become too difficult to do after awhile and I became lazy in the summer. The photos that came out it or the creative process that forced me to take so many…