aquatique

books, knitting, food and whatever else I want to write about

Paris to the Moon is one of my favourite memoirs about a place so I was quite excited to read this book on New York before my trip. I found this book difficult to get into. I really like Gopnik when he is being very personal about himself and family. The first two chapters did not have much about them. The personal stories intertwined with life and observations about New York are the best ones.…

Hello, world! It's good to be back and blogging. It's a rainy Sunday which is great for a day at home reading, writing and relaxing. I've been very busy since I got back from my holiday in NY. I still haven't gone through all my 1000 photos. I forgot how daunting it is to go through so many photos. I am still reading Adam Gopnik's Through the Children's Gate. It's going much more slowly than…

What kind of moving experiences have you had with your books? (Or, just in general if you’ve got good Moving Day stories–and who doesn’t?) Did having to pack and move your books cause any changes in your book-collecting habits? Make you wish you had everything on an e-reader? Feel free to discuss! (grin) - BTT Since I've had to move internationally a couple times, I can say that moving with books is not easy. The…

I enjoyed Theroux's Dark Star Safari some years ago. Whenever I encounter his travel writing, I do like it. I don't always necessarily share all his political views on Africa, but he does have some valid concerns with foreign aid. I really like his writing because he is a traveler and has an exploratory spirit. He was 70 when he did this tour which is probably his last travel of Africa. This last travelogue has…

I was excited for this book because I was a big fan of Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma. Pollan and I have a similar view and philosophy regarding food. In this book, he explores the history that humans have with four processes of cooking: roasting meat (fire), boiling/braising (water), baking bread (air), and fermentation (earth). I loved this book at its introduction: (more…)

Hello, everyone! This week, I posted my review for Son by Lois Lowry and read Cooked by Michael Pollan (review up tomorrow). I started Paul Theroux's The Last Train to Zona Verde yesterday and will finish it up today so I can start Adam Gopnik's Through the Children's Gate. It's been hot and humid these last couple of days. I'm not working these days which is not ideal, but I have free time. I am…

I studied The Giver in school. I really liked it, and have since read the sequels, Gathering Blue, Messenger, and now, Son. I was not as impressed with the sequels as I was with The Giver. I still think that is one of the best Young Adult books from the late twentieth century. I fondly remember the moment when Jonas the learns about the colour red. I'd forgotten a lot of the previous two books…

What classic book has changed your view on life, social mores, political views, or religion? The Classics Club This is a difficult question to answer. I am definitely moved and affected by books. I am not sure if it necessary changes my view on things as in they give me epiphanies. They certainly make me appreciate life much more. There is one classic that does come to mind: Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy: I am…

This is one of those novels that seemed almost like nonfiction. It is based on Kerouac's actual journeys across America so a lot of it was probably real. The inconsistency and wildness seemed too strange to be fiction at times. I don't know what is fact and what is fiction. I liked Kerouac's style early on. Sal the protagonist is observant, perceptive and largely optimistic about life. The novel is set in a time just…