Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones

This was my first book in awhile. I was doing so well in January and February, but things went to the wayside I guess. The dragging winter has made me more lethargic.

In any case, I finally read this on a tired Friday evening. It was due soon and I have not read a novel in a little bit. This is Young Adult so I knew it would go quickly.

I have never read Diana Wynne Jones that I can remember. I love the movie from Studio Ghibli and I’ve been rewatching many of the movies the last couple of months. I wanted to read this novel finally in preparation,

This started off well and there was some slowness in the middle I think, but the ending was lovely and showed how much the characters loved each other. It was a more clear cut good vs evil fairy tale than the movie one. There are more characters in the book though.

This is a series, but a friend of mine told me that the other books were more about stories in the same universe. While the book was a nice read and the ending was satisfying, I don’t really feel the need to read more form this universe.

Coincidentally got the movie a day later from the library and love the movie even more in some ways having read the book.

Read March 24, 2017

Better than Before by Gretchen Rubin

This is my third Gretchen Rubin book. I think I like this one less than her last too on happiness, but it’s still a good book. While Rubin’s nature is more extreme than a lot of people, I actually relate a lot to her in a few ways. We both like research, analysis, introspection, and literature. She is a personal writer too and most of the books have a memoirs and reflective nature similar to journaling. Her writing is quite life affirming as well. I do not buy all the things she advocates, but she is very thorough and reflective.

There were a couple of good tips about habit forming such as starting small, scheduling leisure activities (been trying to do more of this lately), pairing activities/habits, and not giving rewards but giving treats. I have found that when I make a goal, I think the goal itself should be the reward rather than getting myself anything. Rubin’s books often stir my own constant self-awareness and introspection. I like it reflected back to me when I read a book.

This book also introduced the Four Tendencies. I am a Questioner which doesn’t surprise me. I’m probably a more in depth questioner than most. Rubin will have a new book out exploring these tendencies later in the fall.

Alright and easy read for me. I do like the use of quotations.

Read February 14-23, 2017.

Weapons of Math Destruction by Cathy O’Neil

This book about the dangers of Big Data and algorithms primarily in the US. It is a book discussing ethics in Big Data and the lack thereof.

For most of the time I was reading this book, I was a bit dejected by work so reading this book made it even more depressing and despairing. Every chapter focused on how Big Data and algorithms are used for profit and as a result, hurts individuals. The premise of the book started with teachers and there is a significant focus on the effects of Big Data algorithms in an already flawed American education system.

The conclusion chapter is the only one with hope. However it is not enough. I wish the book had given more ideas on how the audience could be aware of new issues in Big Data so that we wouldn’t have to suffer from it. I think the book is an interesting primer for those who know very little about Big Data. However, it also feels like it’s written in some ways for people who know enough of it.

The book has a lot of data and studies and there are end notes. I am going to recommending the book to my Data Scientist colleague.

Read January 31 – Feburary 10, 2017.

Pax by Sara Pennypacker

I think I got this book from some of the recommended new and critically acclaimed lists I get. I like children’s and YA literature even after all these years. The cover art looked interesting so did the premise about the relationship between a fox and his boy owner.

I am not sure if I was expecting too much from this novel, but it did not impress me as much as I wanted to. I have been reading a lot of nonfiction lately and hoped this novel would break it up. It did not quite do that. The book has a heavy anti-war theme which felt a bit overdone. Maybe it’s because it’s been awhile since I read a YA book with such an overt theme. Every chapter basically said how humans are stupid when it comes to war. The ending was anticlimactic in a way. Heartfelt but less than one would think in a story about a boy and his fox.

Having said that, it is by no means a bad read. The main characters are interesting and all develop pretty well. I really liked Vola who is a supporting character and mentor in the book. I also enjoyed the illustrations by Jon Klasen. There weren’t enough of them!

I’d recommend this to children. It’s not a classic for me, but nice enough to read for younger readers.

Read January 24-25, 2017.

The Little Book of Skin Care: Korean Beauty Secrets for Healthy, Glowing Skin by Charlotte Cho

As I have taken on skincare more seriously as a hobby the last few months, I decided to read this book.

I have always had an interest in skincare so wearing SPF, moisturizing, and keeping out of the sun have been habits I have employed since I was a teenager. As I am Asian, a lot of the little quirks and beauty care in East Asia does not surprise or shock me.

What is nice about this book is that if you truly unfamiliar with Asian skin care and beauty, this is a good initial primer on it. I knew most of the information in the book from other sources on the internet, but it is collected here in an easy to read and cutely illustrated book.

There is a very cute section about travelling to Seoul as well. I really liked the book, but I would not necessarily follow the product recommendations. Charlotte Cho does own a curated beauty store so there are incentives for her to sell products she and her company import from Asia. Still, I recommend this book if you have an interest in skincare.

Read January 19-20, 2017.

32 Yolks by Eric Ripert

This was my first book of 2017 and the first since I started my new job. I have been busy and tired with work and the holidays to read. I really missed it. This was a good book to go back to reading. It was short, easy to read, and relatively light for a memoirs.

I have followed Ripert for a few years. I have seen him on Bourdain’s shows and Ripert’s own internet shows. I like his calm, collected, and effortless manner. I found this memoirs a quick read. It engaged and even shocked me at one point. Veronica Chambers who wrote the book from Ripert’s stores did a very good job. I do feel the book was almost too short in a way. It ended when Ripert left France. Does this mean there are plans for a sequel? I feel like there should be more and I’d have been interested to hear more about his friends and family.

In terms of chef memoirs, this was another good one and I wish it had been longer.

Read January 16-18, 2017

League of Dragons by Naomi Novik

The final book in the Temeraire series. I started this series late last year or earlier this year. Luckily enough, the author chose to finish it this year.

This novel was similar to some previous ones. It was slow to start, not a bad middle, and then I zoned out during the battles. The ending was fine.

I would say that the world building in this novel has been fun. I love dragons. Temeraire is a good character and I loved the various settings. Laurence is a character as well. I do think the series has been dragged on slightly. To be honest, there was not a lot of difference between the last two books. The emphasis on the battles bored me. The series even used the amnesia trope at one point. Romance was practically nonexistent in these books which is actually fine. At the times when the books did touch on it for the humans, it felt forced. The dragon romance Temeraire with the Chinese dragon was more interesting but not well explored.

In conclusion, I recommend this series to fantasy and history fans. They are easy and fun to read. I enjoyed going through the series and have not completed a series like this in a long time. I do wonder if Novik will continue another story in this universe.

Read October 25, 2016

Stiletto by Daniel O’Malley

This is a long overdue review. The blog being down and me being generally busy with life and other things means that I cobbled this review from notes and other postings.

This was an eagerly anticipated sequel to The Rook. I read Stiletto without rereading The Rook so I forgot a lot, but you can really read it as a standalone.

All in all, I liked it and found it almost as addictive as the first. I liked the new characters and the new arc featuring the merger. This novel has a ton of world building which is fun and as a fatansy/sci-fi series should. There’s a little of side stories and tidbits. My favourite was Marcel’s story which read like a mini WWII novel (and there are many of those on the market). I found The Roock was not British or English enough; the editing and writing for that part of the world and those characters were lacking. This one was better that way. I believed the characters were British and European.

There was not enough Myfanwy. She continues to grow and I missed her POV in this novel. I do like that this series seems focused on interesting and distinct female protagonists and characters. All three central characters come from different backgrounds and experiences.

Finally, this book is squickier than the last book and in general compared to many other books I read. I’m generally fine these kind of details in books (less so in movies and TV), but this will bother more readers.

To avoid spoiling the book, I will say that there is a villain in this series and Myfawny has a true nemesis. Personally, they are one of the creepiest and darkest villains in a series I’ve read in awhile. I kinda wish the author would introduce a new nemesis for Myfanwny. Hopefully when the take down happens, it will be sweet and worthwhile.

Read September 6-8, 2016.

This was my 42nd book of the year. In 2015, I only managed 42 books. While I will read more books for the rest of the year; the autumn is much busier than I anticipated. As I get older, I still read as fast and love books. They are one of my constant pleasures and hobbies; however, life does get in the way. I have more responsibilities in all areas of my life. Most days, I wish I could forget it all and read and read.

Short Book Reviews of Summer 2016

The following are three books I read in the summer which warranted some mini reviews.

Spark Joy by Marie Kondo

Love KonMari’s philosophy about tidiness and stuff. I find it spiritual and from a good place not of judgment or feeding into consumerism.

Living Alone & Loving It by Barbara Feldon

I love to live alone. This book has avice which i already apply to my life which is to create a space for myself. I am lucky to have my family near by, but I love my own space. This book has practical advice for those who want to love their single and solo life more.

A Beginner’s Guide to Paradise by Alex Sheshunoff

A funny memoirs about time in the South and West Pacific Islands. Made me laugh out loud a couple of times and really captured the early aughts.

The Martian by Andy Weir

This was a fun and exciting page turner. There is something about this novel that does feel different to recent novels I’ve read. Part of it was the focus on space and the excitement from the extreme plot of being stranded on Mars.

The book has urgency and suspense. It pulls the reader in even though after disaster and bad news #4566, it gets a little tiresome watching everyone be able to make it through. There is no way this book could be popular without a happy ending. There were too many catastrophes along the way for that to happen. It had to have somewhat of a good ending.

Mark is likeable though sometimes a little too snarky to be true. I liked almost all the characters, but few of them got thorough development. There were many notable characters. I liked the dialogue in the book. I wish we more on the characters. It does feel more like a plot book rather than a character book which is alright in some ways.

Read August 29-30, 2016.

Continue reading “The Martian by Andy Weir”

Dog on it by Spencer Quinn

I read this for a book club. We have not met for it yet.

This is a mystery novel narrated by a dog. I did not realize this until I started the novel. It’s rather cute actually. There are lots of moments of silliness and adorableness especially if you love dog. I even laughed out lout whenever Chet the dog would narrate how he barked to another dog: “I barked. She barked. I barked. She barked.”

Other than the Chet’s narration, the rest of the novel is not particularly noteworthy. Bernie the private detective is a nice enough guy, but there does not seem to be a lot of depth to all these characters. Part of it is probably because it is narrated by a non-human. However, it does limit things for character development.

The plot was very predictable even for a mystery reader as myself. I was a bit disappointed how basic it was. I think this is a small quibble because this book is a light read. It’s easy writing and if you like desert settings, even better. I will not read on this series. It’s not for me, but I did not dislike the experience.

Read August 21-23, 2016.